Data sets by Time Period (Long-Term or Short-Term)

With the exception of the LFDP Census data (#119), which is collected every five years and the CTE Plot Treatment, collected only after trimming events (#165), we update in this website and in the LTER Network Depository, PASTA, all of our non-spatial and non-meteorological ongoing data sets EVERY 2 Years. Met data from El Verde Field Station are updated each month or after data has gone through our quality control processes (not after a month).

The total number of LUQ's token data sets is: 151 (Added to 1 that has been deprecated and 2 non-LTER hosted data set for a total of 154)
The last Record Number Used for a Data Set is 195
The total number of Long-Term LTER data sets is 69 (Ongoing: 33, Completed: 36)
The total number of Short-Term LTER data sets is 83 (Completed: 83) Note: Long-Term data sets are defined as Duration of more than 5 years

Total of your current selection is: 36

Notes: Highlight both options to obtain a complete list of both Long and Short Term Data Sets
Duration (Period of Time): Long-Term
Numeric Data Set ID Title (Data Set Identifier) Abstract Owner/Creator Duration (Period of Time) Status Date Range
15 Revegetation of landslides, vegetation <0.1m (Small landslide plots at the Luquillo Experimental Forest)

The purpose of this study is to document the recovery of vegetation on new landslides in the Luquillo Experimental Forest, in particular seedlings <1m tall.

Lawrence R. Walker Long-Term Completed 1988 to 2007
18 Revegetation of landslides, vegetation > 1.0m (Large landslide plots at the Luquillo Experimental Forest)

Here we use permanent plot data sampled from 16 landslide to documents temporal successional pathways in landslide patches (without the use of a chronosequence, cf. Guariguata 1990) and address the following questions: (1) What are the successional pathways of landslide and what species define them? How much pathway variation of individual plots is there within these landslides? (2) How similar are pathways among landslide? Is there any evidence that, with time, landslides either converge to a common vegetative enpoint or slow in the rate of successional change?

The purpose of this study is to document the recovery of vegetation on new landslides in the Luquillo Experimental Forest.

Lawrence R. Walker Long-Term Completed 1988 to 2007
29 Bisley daily rainfall (Bisley weekly environmental data)

Data set includes all available daily, weekly, and monthly rainfall from several climate stations in the northeast section of the Luquillo Experimental Forest. These stations are surround the Bisley Experimental watersheds and the Sabana Field Station are are operated by the USFS and the USGS. Weekly canopy throughfall is also collected weekly from the Bisley experimental watersheds.

Grizelle Gonzalez Long-Term Completed 1990 to 2011
31 Bisley 40 X 40 grid vegetation and site characteristics

Relationships between landforms, soil nutrients, forest structure, and the relative importance of different disturbances were quantified in two subtropical wet steepland watersheds in Pueno Rico. Ridges had fewer landslides and treefall gaps, more above-ground biomass, older aged stands, and greater species richness than other landscape positions. Ridge soils had relatively low quantities of exchangeable bases but high soil organic matter, acidity and exchangeable iron. Valley sites had higher frequencies of disturbance, less biomass, younger aged stands, lower species richness and soils with more exchangeable bases. Soil N, P, and K were distributed relatively independently of geomorphic setting, but were significantly related to the composition and age of vegetation. On a watershed basis, hurricanes were the dominant natural disturbance in the turnover of individuals, biomass, and forest canopy. However. turnover by the mortality of individuals that die without creating canopy openings was faster than the turnover by any natural disturbance. Only in riparian areas was forest turnover by treefall gaps faster than turnover by hurricanes. The same downslope mass transfer that links soil forming processes across the landscape also influences the distribution of landslides, treefall gaps, and the structure and composition of the forest. One consequence of these interactions is that the greatest aboveground biomass occurs on ridges where the soil nutrient pools are the smallest. Geomorphic stability, edaphic conditions, and biotic adaptations apparently override the importance of spatial variations in soil nutrients in the accumulation of above-ground biomass at this site.

Tamara Heartsill-Scalley Long-Term Completed 1988 to 2004
33 Meteorological data from towers (pre-Hugo) or rooftop (post Hugo) at El Verde

The meteorological sensors were installed above the flat concrete roof of El Verde Field Station (elevation: 350 m asl). The building is in an approx. 0.3 ha clearing in a forest approx. 20 m tall. Data were processed and temporarily stored in a Campbell 21X data logger on-site. The station was initiated after the September 1989 hurricane. As this station was installed 3 meters above a concrete rooftop in a forest clearing, dry air temperatures during daylight hours are higher than those that would be measured in the adjacent forest. The USGS maintains a nearby (100 m away) station on a 20 m tower (since 1992). An additional station for temperature and humidity measurements in the forest understory was added in 1997. Additional measurements of daily rainfall and maximum and minimum air temperatures for this site since 1975 exist on separate files.

Alonso RamIrez Long-Term Completed 1995 to 2000
36 Landslide Revegetation Canopy Measurements & Cover Estimates

The purpose of this data set is to document recovery of vegetation in new landslides in the Luquillo Experimental Forest (LEF)

Lawrence R. Walker Long-Term Completed 1988 to 2007
41 Habitat selection/Caracolus caracolla and other snails

Various habitat characteristics are presented, as well as the apparency of common plant taxa at 7 heights (every 0.5 m from ground level to 3 m). The files are divided because variables measured varied by year.

Michael R. Willig Long-Term Completed 1991 to 2014
42 Bisley Grid Habitat data 1994, 1999

The data set consists of one file containing data from the summers of 1994 and 1999. Various habitat characteristics are presented, as well as the apparency of common plant taxa at 7 heights (every 0.5 m from ground level to 3 m). However, the data for some plant species were not divided by height in 1994; only total apparency of those species is available for that year.

Michael R. Willig Long-Term Completed 1994 to 1999
43 Bisley Grid Invertebrate Data, 1989-1999

The data set consists of counts of terrestrial invertebrates from the grid at Bisley Watersheds #1 and 2, for the years 1989, 1990, 1994, and 1999. Data for 1989 and 1990 are confined to 4 species of terrestrial snails: Caracolus caracolla, Gaeotis nigrolineata, Nenia tridens, and Polydontes acutangula. Counts for other snail species and the walking stick Lamponius portoricensis are available for 1994 and 1999.

Michael R. Willig Long-Term Completed 1989 to 1999
44 Frog population plots (El Verde + Bisley)

Long-term population patterns of coquies likely result from a variety of influences. Key among these are moisture, the physical habitat as affected by succession and disturbances of various scales, and predator population. Here, I present data on each of these factors along with a nine-year record of population numbers of coquies in four long-term study plots in the Luquillo Experimental Forest (LEF) of northeastern Puerto Rico.

Lawrence L. Woolbright Long-Term Completed 1987 to 2017
45 Frog spatial distribution data (El Verde + Bisley)

Most Puerto Rican Eleutherodactylus are terrestrial frogs that breed for prolonged periods of time in more or less continuous habitat. Because their life cycle lacks a free living larvae stage, reproductive behavior is not tied to bodies of water and they do not have the large aggregations typical of many aquatic breeders. For these reasons, assessing their population status requires examining fairly large areas of habitat. I began systematically sampling the anuran community on a 12 ha grid at the Bisley watersheds in 1989 and a second 16 ha grid at El Verde in 1993. These efforts have provided a comprehensive data set that can be used to evaluate future changes in the anuran community in this forest.

Count of frogs, various frog predators, and various frog preys were taken at regular intervals on the grids.

Lawrence L. Woolbright Long-Term Completed 1988 to 1993
58 USGS Long-term daily streamflow data at several LEF locations

The daily data are summarized to monthly as follows:
Daily average CFS are summed for each month and multiplied by 86400 (seconds per day) to yield cubic feet per month. This value is divided by the particular watershed area and multiplied by another conversion factor to yield cm water equivalent depth discharged by each watershed per month. This allows direct hydrologic comparison of watersheds of different sizes. Time series plots illustrate the biennial periodicity of high and low discharges, and particular floods and droughts. October 1970 was the historic flood for PR, recently exceeded during the passage of Hurricane Hortense in September 1996. The historic drought occurred during 1993-1994 and is clearly visible in these records.

Table 1. United States Geological Survey (USGS) streamflow records from the Luquillo Experimental Forest. The periods of record presented here end with the 1994 water year (except for those stations whose records ended earlier). Watershed records are subdivided (a,b, etc.) when substantial gaps exist. The watersheds indicated with abbreviations are those where streamwater chemistry has also been measured. (NOTE: For recent data visit the USGS the Surface-Water Data for Puerto Rico web site at: http://waterdata.usgs.gov/pr/nwis/sw)

USGS ID
Numbers
Stream
Name
Record
Begins
Record
Ends
Watershed
Area (km2)
55750 Rio Gurabo below El Mango 3/10/90 9/30/94 57.80
57000a, 57000b Rio Gurabo at Gurabo 10/1/59 12/31/75 155.90
61300 Rio Canovanillas 1/1/67 12/31/73 37.30
61800a, 61800b Rio Canovanas 3/28/67 12/31/80 25.48
62500 Rio Herrera 7/21/66 12/31/73 7.12
63250 Rio Espiritu Santo 7/1/45 12/31/52 5.52
63300 Rio Espiritu Santo 3/1/67 12/31/73 5.78
63440 Quebrada Sonadora(QS) 3/29/83 9/30/94 2.62
63500 Quebrada Toronja (QT) 4/1/83 9/30/94 0.17
63800a, 63800b Rio Espiritu Santo nr Rio Grande 8/1/66 12/31/79 22.33
64200a, 64200b, 64200c Rio Grande nr El Verde 5/9/67 12/31/70 18.93
65500a, 65500b Rio Mameyes nr Sabana 8/2/67 12/31/73 17.82
65700 Rio Mameyes at Hwy 191 10/1/66 1/24/85 30.57
67000 Rio Sabana 10/1/79 9/30/94 10.26
71000a, 71000b Rio Fajardo nr Fajardo      
73400 Quebrada Palma 9/8/72 9/30/77 12.54
75000a, 75000b Rio Icacos 7/1/45 3/31/53 3.26
76000 Rio Blanco 10/1/82 1/25/85 31.86
77000 Rio Blanco 9/8/72 9/30/77 45.59
Q1metstation Quebrada 1 Bisley 9/19/88 9/18/94 0.067
Q2metstation Quebrada 2 Bisley 9/19/88 9/18/94 0.0634
Q3metstation Quebrada 3 Bisley 9/19/88 9/18/94 0.35

Douglas A. Schaefer Long-Term Completed 1945 to 1994
62 Canopy height profile starting 1992, 1994 and 1996 of the Luquillo Forest Dynamics Plot (LFDP), Puerto Rico

File LFDP_canopy contain the canopy heights for the Luquillo forest Dynamics plot. The first measurement started in 1992, and it was planned to measure the canopy height profile every 2 years. So far censuses starting in 1992, 1994, and 1996 have been completed. In the 1992 census the canopy height profile at points along the East and North limits of the plot were not included. In 1994 and 1996 these extra points were assessed. The National Science Foundation requires that data from projects it funds are posted on the web two years after any data set has been organized and "cleaned". The data from each census of the LFDP will be updated at intervals as each survey of the LFDP shows errors in the previous data collection. After posting on the web, researchers who are not part of the project are then welcome to use the data. Given the enormous amount of time, effort and resources required to manage the LFDP, obtain these data, and ensure data accuracy, LFDP Principal Investigators request that researchers intending to use this data comply with the requests below. Through complying with these requests we can ensure that the data are interpreted correctly, analyses are not repeated unnecessarily, beneficial collaboration between users is promoted and the Principle Investigators investment in this project is protected. Submit to the LFDP PIs a short (1 page) description of how you intend to use the data; · Invite LFDP PIs to be co-authors on any publication that uses the data in a substantial way (some PIs may decline and other LFDP scientists may need to be included); If the LFDP PIs are not co-authors, send the PIs a draft of any paper using LFDP data, so that the PIs may comment upon it; In the methods section of any publication using LFDP data, describe that data as coming from the "Luquillo Forest Dynamics Plot, part of the Luquillo Experimental Forest Long-Term Ecological Research Program"; Acknowledge in any publication using LFDP data the "The Luquillo Experimental Forest Long-Term Ecological Research Program, supported by the U.S. National Science Foundation, the University of Puerto Rico, and the International Institute of Tropical Forestry"; · Supply the LFDP PIs with 10 reprints of any publication using LFDP data. · Accept that the LFDP PIs can not guarantee that the LFDP data you intend to use, has not already been submitted for publication or published.

Jess Zimmerman Long-Term Completed 1992 to 1997
70 USDC NOAA's National Climatic Data Center daily precipitation (5 stations)

Daily precipitation at five stations in or near the LEF have been compiled by the National Climate Data Center. Here, WE present monthly sums of precipitation (P, in cm). Data are summarized through July 1992. Station details are as follows:

Location Longitude Latitude Elevation
(in meters)
Period Covered Type of record (P= precipitation, T= Temperature)
Pico del Este 18 15' 65 45' 1051 1969-1992 P,T
Rio Grande 18 21' 65 49' 107 1956-1984 P
Rio Blanco Upper 18 16' 65 47' 439 1955-1974 P
Rio Blanco Lower 18 14' 65 47' 35 1955-1992 P
Fajardo 18 20' 65 39' 12 1931- 1992 P,T

Note: Max and Min temperature can be found at: http://luq.lternet.edu/data/luqmetadata71 and http://luq.lternet.edu/data/luqmetadata72, respectively

Nickolas Brokaw Long-Term Completed 1931 to 1992
71 USDC NOAA's National Climatic Data Center monthly average of maximum temperature (2 stations)

Maximum air temperature at two stations in or near the LEF have been compiled by the National Climate Data Center. Here we present monthly averages of the maximum air temperatures. Data are averaged per month through July 1992.
Station general details are as follows:

Station Longitude  Latitude Elevation
(in meters)
Period
Covered

Type of record
(Precipitation or Temperature)
Pico del Este
65 45' 18 15' 1051 1969-1992 P,T
Fajardo
65 39' 18 20' 12 1931-1992 P,T
Nickolas Brokaw Long-Term Completed 1931 to 1992
72 USDC NOAA's National Climatic Data Center monthly minimum temperature (2 stations)

Daily precipitation, maximum, and minimum air temperature at five stations in or near the LEF have been compiled by the National Climate Data Center. Here I present monthly sums of precipitation (P, in cm) and monthly averages (T, in oF) of the maximum and minimum air temperatures. Data are summarized through July 1992 and additional data will be added when it becomes available.

Douglas A. Schaefer Long-Term Completed 1931 to 1992
75 Fern sporophyte growth observation at the Luquillo Experimental Forest (LEF)

Long-term (20-year) monitoring sites for monitoring ferns were established in the Luquillo Experimental Forest in 1991.  Individuals of approximately 20 species of ferns were monitored on a regular basis from September 1991 through January 2010 to document annual and seasonal variation in plant and leaf traits, leaf  and spore production rates, as well as  and leaf damage levels. Effects of natural disturbanceincluding a drought in 1994 and Hurricane Georges in 1998 are reflected in these observations. The study includes sites in the El Verde, and Espiritu Santo and Bisley watersheds.  The data set also includes observations from a comparative study of ferns in the mangrove community at the Jobos Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve that was begun in January 1998 and completed in January 2001.

Joanne M. Sharpe Long-Term Completed 1991 to 2010
77 NADP/NTN precipitation chemistry data

We report here the chemistry of weekly wet-only rainfall from the Luquillo Experimental Forest (LEF) NADP station (code PR20) for the period February 1985 through December 1996. Our station was knocked out by Hurricane Hugo in September 1989, and not reestablished until May 1991. The station remains in active service to the present and data from 1997 onwards is available directly from the NADP/NTN web site. //nadp.sws.uiuc.edu/nadpdata/state.asp?state=PR Samples are collected weekly on Tuesdays, field measurements of pH and conductivity are made, and the water sample is shipped to NADP for chemical analysis.

Alonso RamIrez Long-Term Completed 1985 to 1994
86 Fungi of the Greater Antilles

Over 20 researchers and cooperators were enlisted to produce a survey of the basidiomycetes of Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands, Dominican Republic, and Jamaica. This included all basidiomycetes except rusts and smuts. These islands in the Greater Antilles were chosen for this survey for several reasons. There was previously very limited documentation on macrobasidiomycete diversity for these islands, although recent studies had shown that at least 15% of the species were undescribed. This project complemented previous and ongoing surveys in Mexico, Costa Rica, and Venezuela. The information gained from this project will ultimately help us to understand differences in colonization and rates of speciation among different groups of basidiomycetes in island chains. The investigators in this project discovered at least 75 new species and varieties so far, as well as several new genera (Pegler et al. 1998; Samuels & Lodge 1996) and one possible new family or order (see 'Aliens' under GENUS). Various cooperators have graciously provided identification of ascomycetes, myxomycetes, and mitosporic fungi, which are also included in the database.

D. Jean Lodge Long-Term Completed 1983 to 2003
97 Sabana pasture permanent plot vegetation sampling

Permanent plot data is expected to show these temporal patterns: (1) rapid increases in percent cover and tree stem density, and (2) rapid turnover from early to late successional plant species. Plant-plant competition should show quick increases in intensity with native grass species and exotic as top competitors. These may lead to exclusion of some trees common after landslide disturbance. Spatial patterns of invading trees should include edge effects due to dispersal limitation with clumping of bird-dispersed species before the first five years after cow exclusion. Because of intact soil and low vegetation in the pasture trees should grow, as measured by biomass(productivity), height, and basal diameter increases, significantly faster compared to colonization of landslides.

Randall W. Myster Long-Term Completed 1995 to 2003
101 Ecuador old fields permanent plot vegetation sampling

Permanent plot data is expected to show these temporal patterns: (1) rapid increases in percent cover and tree stem density, and (2) rapid turnover from early to late successional plant species. Plant-plant competition should show quick increases in intensity with native grass species and exotics as top competitors. These may lead to exclusion of some trees common after landslide disturbance. Spatial patterns of invading trees should include edge effects due to dispersal limitation with clumping of bird-dispersed species before the first five years after cow exclusion. Because of intact soil and low vegetation trees should grow, as measured by biomass(productivity), height, and basal diameter increases, significantly faster compared to colonization of landslides.

Randall W. Myster Long-Term Completed 1998 to 2011
117 Bromeliad plant collection details/data from different elevations in the LEF

Collection details of bromeliads collected for invertebrate community and diversity analysis from 4 localities in the LEF. Dates, location, plant size, amounts, pH and temp. of contained water, and weights of debris retained by the bromeliads.

Barbara A. Richardson Long-Term Completed 1993 to 2010
131 Bromeliad invertebrate counts at different elevations in the LEF

Identification and number of invertebrates recovered from each bromeliad sampled. Collection details of bromeliads collected for invertebrate community and diversity analysis from 3 localities in the Luquillo Experimental Forest. Dates, elevations and forest types, plant size, amounts, pH and temp. of contained water, weights of debris retained by the bromeliads, and counts of organisms, identified to species or morphospecies, collected from each plant.

Barbara A. Richardson Long-Term Completed 1993 to 2010
134 Invertebrate dry weight data in various locations, mostly within the LEF at El Verde Contains information [identity, counts, size, fresh and dry weights] of various collections of invertebrates (and the occasional amphibian or reptile), which has allowed formulae describing the relationship between length and dry wt. of invertebrates to be obtained. These have been used in estimating biomass in studies of bromeliad, heliconia and litter inveretebrates in the LEF. They will have a wider application. Michael J. Richardson Long-Term Completed 1996 to 2006
138 Conservation and management of migratory fauna and dams in tropical streams of Puerto Rico

1. Compared to most other tropical regions, Puerto Rico appears to have dammed its running waters decades earlier and to a greater degree. The island has more large dams per unit area than many countries in both tropical and temperate regions (e.g., 3x that of the U.S.), and the peak rate of large dam construction occurred two and three decades prior to reported peak rates in Latin America, Asia and Africa.

2. Puerto Rico is a potential window into the future of freshwater migratory fauna in tropical regions, given the island's extent and magnitude of dam development and the available scientific information on ecology and management of the island's migratory fauna.

3. We review ecology, management and conservation of migratory fauna in relation to dams in Puerto Rico. Our review includes a synthesis of recent and unpublished observations on upstream effects of large dams on migratory fauna and an analysis of patterns in free crest spillway discharge across Puerto Rican reservoirs. Analyses suggest that large dams with rare spillway discharge cause near, not complete, extirpation of upstream populations of migratory fauna. They also suggest several management and conservation issues in need of further research and consideration. These include research on the costs, benefits and effectiveness of simple fish/shrimp passage designs involving simulating spillway discharge and the appropriateness of establishing predatory fishes in reservoirs of historically fishless drainages.

Effie A. Greathouse Long-Term Completed 1993 to 2003
148 Bisley rainfall and throughfall, and chemistry of rainfall and throughfall

This data set contain summaries and analyses mean of collected weekly measurements expressed as mm per day,  and calculation of fluxes, rates and means calculated after water chemistry analyses are conducted. Rainfall and throughfall are collected weekly at the Bisley LEF site. These data sets begin March 1988 and ends December 2003.

Rain and throughfall samples are the total catch for the week, and are exposed to field conditions for that time. No event sampling is conducted on a routine basis. Rainfall Collected in Bisley (RCB) are bulk or always-open collectors that receive dry deposition by sedimentation.

All samples are measured for pH and conductivity, and then filtered (pre-combusted Whatman GF/F glass fiber filter) prior to further analysis. From 1983-1994 samples were cooled and returned to the San Juan chemistry laboratory for analysis. During those years, samples for NH4 and NO3 analyses were refrigerated continuously until analysis. Sub samples for NH4 analysis were also preserved with 1 molar HCl. From 1994 on, samples for NH4 and NO3 were frozen until analysis, were not acidified, and all analyses were conducted at the University of New Hampshire.

Nutrient fluxes in rainfall and throughfall were measured weekly in a mature subtropical wet forest in NE Puerto Rico over a 15-year period that included the effects of five hurricanes and several prolonged droughts. Annual inputs of K, Ca, Mg, Cl, Na, and SO4-S are similar to those reported from other marine-influenced tropical forests. Rainfall input of nitrogen is comparatively low and reflects the relative isolation of the air shed. Mean annual rainfall and throughfall were 3482 and 2131 mm yr-1 respectively. On average, rainfall, throughfall, rainfall pH, and rainfall flux NH4-N and NO3-N had small but significant decreases throughout the study period. More nutrients fluxes had seasonal differences in rainfall (6 out of 12) than throughfall (4 out of 12). All volume weighted enrichment ratios calculated for the 15-year period were greater than one. However, median weekly enrichment ratios were less than 1 for sea salts and dissolved organic carbon and between 1 and 2 for Mg, Ca, SiO2 and SO4-S. In contrast, median weekly enrichment ratios were greater than 10 for NH4-N, PO4-P, and K and reflect biological enrichment within the canopy. Droughts reduced enrichment ratios of cations and sea-salts, but increased enrichment ratios for NH4-N, PO4-P and K. In the weeks following hurricanes relative throughfall tends to be higher and enrichment ratios tend to be lower. These long-term observations indicate that physical and biological processes associated with water passing through the canopy act to buffer internal nutrient cycles from inter-annual, and seasonal variations in rainfall inputs.

Tamara Heartsill-Scalley Long-Term Completed 1988 to 2015
150 Pattern morphology for frogs captured at 9 locations in northeastern Puerto Rico over a 25-year period from 1978 to 2002

We recorded the pattern morph for 9,950 frogs captured at 9 locations in northeastern Puerto Rico over a 25-year period from 1978 - 2002. Data revealed 21 distinct pattern morphs including a variety of stripes, bars, and spots. Analysis of morph frequencies between plots showed significant heterogeneity, with longitudinal stripes more common in grassland and disturbed areas, and spot and bar morphs more common in forests where palm and bromeliad axils are important habitat features. Comparison of morph frequencies through time at the same sites showed temporal shifts immediately following Hurricane Hugo in 1989. We suggest that the pattern polymorphism is maintained in part by local habitat matching resulting from selection pressure from visual predators.

Lawrence L. Woolbright Long-Term Completed 1987 to 2002
156 Daily streamflow (Bisley area, 5 stations: Q1, Q2, Q3, Sabana, Puente Roto)

The daily data are summarized to monthly as follows:
Daily average CFS are summed for each month and multiplied by 86400 (seconds per day) to yield cubic feet per month. This value is divided by the particular watershed area and multiplied by another conversion factor to yield cm water equivalent depth discharged by each watershed per month. This allows direct hydrologic comparison of watersheds of different sizes. Time series plots illustrate the biennial periodicity of high and low discharges, and particular floods and droughts. October 1970 was the historic flood for PR, recently exceeded during the passage of Hurricane Hortense in September 1996. The historic drought occurred during 1993-1994 and is clearly visible in these records.

Grizelle Gonzalez Long-Term Completed 1987 to 2010
158 Physical and chemical attributes of Quebrada Prieta, Bisley 3, Bisley 5, and Toronja related to shrimp populations measurements Physical parameters, densities and sizes of two species of freshwater shrimps (Atya lanipes and Xiphocaris elongata) in four headwater streams (Quebrada Prieta, Toronja, Bisley 3 and Bisley 5) have been censused 2 times yearly since 1998 to determine the effects of predatory fishes on shrimp size and spatial distributions of pools relative to locations of waterfalls. Todd Crowl Long-Term Completed 1988 to 2005
163 Patterns in litterfall production from 12 forested sites along an elevation gradient in Pico del Este

We measured litterfall from 12 sites along an upper elevation gradient every two weeks from 1994 to present. Samples are being used to estimate the litterfall productivity over time and space, identify the impacts of periodic events, and help us understand the drivers of ecosystem and biogeochemical processes with climate and vegetation change.

Whendee Silver Long-Term Completed 1994 to 2004
164 Canopy Trimming Experiment (CTE) trace gases

This data set provides the monthly trace effluxes measured across the soil-atmosphere interface from five soil surface chambers in all the CTE plots.

Whendee Silver Long-Term Completed 2004 to 2010
173 Bird abundance – mist nets in the Luquillo Forest Dynamics Plot and Nora Devoe Cut Plots in the Luquillos Experimental Forest

This project seeks to measure long-term trends and variability in bird populations in tabonuco forest at El Verde. Repeated measures of bird populations using mist nets are conducted annually in the Luquillo Forest Dynamics Plot. For each bird caught, I obtain physical measurements (weight, length of wing, length of tail), and estimates of fat, age, and breeding condition. Captured birds are marked to estimate mortality and longevity. Data on canopy openness are also collected annually at each mist net as part of this project.

Robert B. Waide Long-Term Completed 1990 to 2005
181 Maximum temperature at El Verde Field Station, Rio Grande, Puerto Rico from January 1975 to August 1992

Daily emperature has been measured at the El Verde Field Station since 1975 (see methods). Average record show that maximum values for maximum temperature recorded from May to October with a range from 29 to 30 and peaks of 29.7 Centigrade in October. The months of October through December show the most dramatic increase, specially December. Highest average maximum temperatures during these years were recorded in 1998 and 1999.

Alonso RamIrez Long-Term Completed 1975 to 1992
186 Fern leaf traits observation at the Luquillo Experimental Forest (LEF)

Ferns are a common element of the understory of forests, yet little is known about the dynamics of leaf production. The long-term role of an individual fern in the ecosystem understory is a function of the number and size of leaves produced over time and the quality of those leaves. Selected functional plant traits (see also LUQ186 -Fern nutrients) were measured in order to supplement non-destructive measurements and detect patterns of primary productivity of ferns in the long-term studies at the Luquillo forest where ferns have been included (eg. Fern growth and demography (LUQ75), Canopy Trimming Experiment (LUQ143 and LUQ146) and the Luquillo Forest Dynamics Plot). Among the important characteristics of fern leaves in the forest understory are the area and biomass of leaves needed to calculate specific leaf area (SLA), leaf dry-matter content (LDMC) and leaf shrinkage. Therefore a large sample of whole leaves and leaf material from several species in the Luquillo Experimental Forest understory was collected, weighed and leaf area measured. The means and regression relationships among these functional traits for species, leaf type and leaf size can then be used to estimate leaf production and turnover rates in temporal studies of fern growth.

Joanne M. Sharpe Long-Term Completed 1996 to 2014
187 Fern leaf nutrients observation at the Luquillo Experimental Forest (LEF)

Ferns are a common element of the understory of forests yet little is known about the dynamics of leaf production.  The long-term role of an individual fern in the ecosystem understory is a function of the number and size of leaves produced over time and the quality of those leaves.  Selected functional plant traits (see also LUQ186 -Fern nutrients) were measured in order to supplement non-destructive measurements and detect patterns of primary productivity of ferns in the long-term studies at the Luquillo forest where ferns have been included (eg. Fern growth and demography (LUQ75) Canopy Trimming Experiment (LUQ143 and LUQ146) and the Luquillo Forest Dynamics Plot). Among the important characteristics of fern leaves in the forest understory are the area and biomass of leaves needed to calculate specific leaf area (SLA) leaf dry-matter content (LDMC) and leaf shrinkage.  Therefore a large sample of whole leaves and leaf material from several species in the Luquillo Experimental Forest understory was collected weighed and leaf area measured.  The means and regression relationships among these functional traits for species leaf type and leaf size can then be used to estimate leaf production and turnover rates in temporal studies of fern growth.

Joanne M. Sharpe Long-Term Completed 1999 to 2009
192 Luquillo Forest Dynamics Plot (LFDP) Liana Data

Liana demographic data from the 16-Ha Big Grid (LFDP) over time: These data contain liana and tree data for two demographic censuses (summer 2001 and summer 2015) from 20 randomly selected quadrats within the LFDP (10 in the northern LFDP -cover classes 1-3 sensu Thompson et al. 2002) and 10 in the southern LFDP (cover class 4 sensu Thompson et al. 2002).

Nickolas Brokaw Long-Term Completed 2011 to 2015